Aeschylus' Use of Psychological Terminology: Traditional and by Shirley D. Sullivan

By Shirley D. Sullivan

Sullivan specializes in 8 key mental phrases - phr n, thumos, kardia, kear, tor, nous, prapides, and psych - that seem often in old Greek texts yet that have quite a lot of attainable meanings. accumulating circumstances from The Persians, Seven opposed to Thebes, Suppliants, Agamemnon, Choephoroi, and Eumenides (instances from Prometheus certain, whose authorship is in query, are taken care of in notes and an appendix), Sullivan first examines every one psychic time period individually. She then discusses circumstances of the phrases in every one play, studying the which means of the psychic time period within the context of the play within which it sounds as if and offering information on Aeschylus' utilization. This booklet sheds gentle at the wealthy and occasionally difficult approach during which Aeschylus makes use of mental terminology and is a wonderful reference for classicists, psychologists, philosophers, and students of comparative literature.

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Example text

Health can end in sickness (1001-4). Good fortune can encounter sudden disaster (1005-7). Dispensing with some wealth can save a household (1008-14). Zeus's goodness can stop a famine (1015-17). For human beings death by murder is irrevocable and must be so (1019-24). In the case of the first four truths, change is the central point. In the fifth no change is possible. These lines may be what thumos "sings" (993-4), having no "dear courage of hope" because the murder of Iphigenia has taken place and cannot be undone.

Kardia. " In earlier poets we find no explicit mention of kardia and nouns for fear, but some passages suggest that it was involved in this emotion. At //. " As he insults Agamemnon, Achilles says that he has "the kradie of a deer" (//. 225). Pindar, in fr. " Aeschylus, in his image, places fear as "flying" and "standing before" kardia, enveloping it and making its presence deeply felt. He will place "fear" there again at Choe. 1024 when Orestes begins to go mad. " We find only one association of kardia with prophecy in earlier poetry.

In earlier poets we find no explicit mention of kardia and nouns for fear, but some passages suggest that it was involved in this emotion. At //. " As he insults Agamemnon, Achilles says that he has "the kradie of a deer" (//. 225). Pindar, in fr. " Aeschylus, in his image, places fear as "flying" and "standing before" kardia, enveloping it and making its presence deeply felt. He will place "fear" there again at Choe. 1024 when Orestes begins to go mad. " We find only one association of kardia with prophecy in earlier poetry.

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